Roman Bailouts

History Lessons We Refuse To Learn – Roman Folly is Modern Folly


Creeping Incrementalism is incremental change of the status quo that is meant to guide humanity into a “new era” where all the rules have changed, and the old morals and standards are put away. Often, to achieve this progressive evolution, those behind agendas that push for societal shifts increase the strength of government, often at the expense of individual freedom. The societal changes, aimed at making the citizens more “enlightened,” result in a loss of absolute standards, and eventually lead to the complete demoralization of a society. Once all values and standards are eliminated, and civilizations follow a more relativistic and pluralistic direction, the civilization crumbles from within – unable to fend off corruption and the eventual chaos that arises out of the uncertainty of what is right and wrong.

Great societies of the past have met their doom after pursuing such a course. But who would have ever thought that part of the collapse of these great societies was also economic failures not much unlike today’s.

In short, the Romans tried bailouts too. And guess what? They failed.

Amazing how little we learn from history . . . as we repeat the very same folly. Of course, how are we going to recognize the right and wrong of economics if we can’t even keep our moral standards in place?

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Published in: on December 4, 2008 at 4:20 am  Leave a Comment  

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